Sustainable Blog

10 Things to Do With Banana Peels

Think a banana peel is only good for the trash? Guess again.

10 Things to Do with Banana Peels

Perfect sliced on a bowl of cereal, blended in a smoothie, or just enjoyed by itself as an afternoon snack, the banana is the most popular fruit in the United States. According to the Lempert Report, 96 percent of U.S. consumers report buying bananas once a month. The fruit even comes with its own convenient packaging, a peel that doubles as a mess-free way to hold it. And when you’re done, you just discard the peel like any old wrapper. But should you?

Have you ever thought about where all those discarded peels end up? Yep, with the rest of the trash at the landfill, where they produce methane gas, a greenhouse gas 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide, as they rot. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, uneaten food accounts for 20% of methane emissions, which are a major contributor to global warming.

As it turns out, those peels don’t have to be trash. Eating the cooked peel along with the banana’s flesh is common in many Asian recipes, and as we peeled away the information, we found lots of other fantastic ways to use banana peels, from fertilizing tomato plants to making banana vinegar, as well as tips on helping bananas stay fresh and using overripe bananas. Here’s a handy infographic with all the ideas. Help us protect the peels!

10 Things to Do With Banana Peels Infographic To find recipes for overripe bananas, visit our Banana Pinterest board

Ellen Niz
Sustainable America Contributor

Want to see more infographics like this? Donate to Sustainable America.

SOURCES
ers.usda.gov/data-products/chart-gallery/detail.aspx?chartId=30486#.U7_9jl6WvHe
community.plu.edu/~bananas/economic/home.html
chiquitabananas.com/Banana-Information/find-banana-farm-map.aspx
bananalink.org.uk/how-bananas-are-grown
chiquitabananas.com/Banana-Information/selecting-handling-ripening-bananas.aspx
rd.com/home/9-extraordinary-uses-for-bananas/
divinecaroline.com/life-etc/home-food/15-surprising-uses-bananas
lifehacker.com/5967424/keep-bananas-fresh-longer-by-separating-them-and-wrapping-the-stems-in-plastic-wrap
blogs.houstonpress.com/eating/2010/02/growing_tomatoes_start_eating.php
blog.trashbackwards.com/2013/05/16/20-uses-for-banana-peels/
livestrong.com/article/457082-what-are-the-benefits-of-eating-banana-peels/
http://www.feedipedia.org/node/684

RELATED ARTICLES
10 Things to Do With Stale Bread
How Much Food Do Americans Waste?
5 Ways to Curb Food Waste at Home

Blog posts delivered weekly.

Recent Posts

Categories

Monthly Archive

By the Numbers

Currently 50 million households suffer from food insecurity, meaning that family members cannot always meet their basic food needs.

10 million people a year could be fed through the recovery of just one-fifth of food waste.

Only 2% of food waste is composted or otherwise recycled—62% of paper is recycled.

Consumers throw out about 40% of the fresh and frozen fish they buy.

The U.S. produced 208 pounds of meat per person in 2009—60% more than Europe.

Low income commuters spend a much higher proportion of their wages on gas—8.6% versus 2.1% at $4 per gallon.

Food prices rose 35-40 percentage points between 2002–2008.

Americans consume 25% of the world’s produced oil, but our nation holds less than 3% of the world’s proven oil reserves.

The International Energy Agency says greenhouse gas emissions rose 3.2% last year, with a 9.3% increase in China offsetting declines in the US and EU.